Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Candye Kane to play first Junkyard Juke of 2013




 
DATE:                       Saturday, March 30th 2013
TIME:                        2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
LOCATION:              Daniel Day Gallery,
                                 3025 6th Avenue S, Birmingham, AL 35223
Admission:               $12, BYOB

Event sponsored by the Magic City Blues Society.

On Saturday March 30th, 2013 the Magic City Blues Society will hold the first of 2013’s three Junkyard Jukes. This Blues music series which started in 2007 has become a popular neighborhood event. Today it’s necessary to bring your chair and arrive early if you are going to secure a good seat for the afternoon’s music. This rain or shine event will be held outside on the patio or inside as the weather may dictate.

The Daniel Day Gallery host for the event will have a wide variety of painting, photographs and gift items by local artisans on display.

The Gallery doesn’t have a liquor license; however coolers are welcome at this event.


The headliner will be Blues diva Candye Kane. Opening will be local band Bourbon and Bleach.

 

Candye Kane

A colorful mixture of the traditional and the eclectic, Kane cut her musical teeth in the early 80's onstage with Hollywood musicians and friends, Social Distortion, Dwight Yoakum, Dave Alvin, The Blasters, X, Fear and Los Lobos, to name just a few. While raising two sons, this role model for the disenfranchised, championed large sized women, fought for the equal rights of sex workers and the GLBT community and inspired music lovers everywhere. Her fans are a mixture of true outsiders: bikers, blues fans, punk rockers, drag queens, fat girls, queers, burlesque dancers, porn fans, sex workers, rockabilly and swing dancers, grey haired hippies, sex positive feminists and everyday folk of all ages, flock to see Candye and hear her musical messages of love, hope and empowerment.

Kanes' live shows are the stuff of legend. She honors the bold blues women of the past with both feet firmly planted in the present. She belts - growls - shouts - croons and moans from a lifetime of suffering and overcoming obstacles. She uses music as therapy and often writes and chooses material with positive affirmations that leave the audience feeling healed and exhilarated. A show that is part humor, revival meeting and sexuality celebration, she'll deliver a barrelhouse-tongue in-cheek blues tune or a gospel ballad like Jesus and Mohammed, encouraging audiences to leave behind religious intolerance. She'll slay the crowd with her balls out rendition of Whole Lotta Love or glorify the virtues of zaftig women with 200 pounds of fun. She often says she is a "fat black drag queen trapped in a white woman's body" and she dresses the part. Bedecked in bright colored feathers, sequins and rhinestones, Kane's performance is Mississippi by way of Las Vegas with a quick stopover in San Francisco.

A Blues Diva of the 20th century who can liven up any party without shedding a stitch - People Magazine
A true celebrity diva- New Yorker Magazine

This tough cookie wails with a rousing confidence and affirmation of identity and the courage of her convictions - Downbeat Magazine

A serious and seriously powerful singer who lays it all on the line - The Philadelphia Inquirer

A voice that is a natural wonder - like the Grand Canyon. - The Washington Post

Candye Kane has that big, brassy voice that has authority and sass; the kind of thing men like because it’s seductive and women like because it’s powerful - BB King to the San Diego Reader

Additional information also available on these web sites:


The Magic City Blues Society is a non-profit (501-C) organization founded on January 10, 1993.
The purposes of the society are:
(1) to encourage the performances of the Blues; (2) to encourage the preservation of the Blues; (3) to develop an appreciation of the Blues within the community; and (4) such other charitable civic, literary or cultural activities within the community consistent with the purposes stated above.
The Blues is very much a part of Southern life and history, deserving recognition as a valid and historical folk art form.

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